3 easy ways to prevent bug-related disasters

In 2003, there was a massive blackout that affected eight states in the U.S. and over 50 million people. The cause? A software bug that caused the operating systems of 256 power plants to crash.

One of the most famous software disasters was the Y2K bug, which was simply a programming error in which only two digits were utilized to represent the year. Other famous software bugs include a Paypal deposit of $92 Quadrillion dollars (yes, QUADrillion!) to a single user’s account and Nissan having to recall almost a million vehicles in 2014 for faulty airbags.

While these infamous bug stories have become quite legendary, no entrepreneur or business owner wants to find themselves included in this type of news story. There are several ways to protect your organization from software bugs like these. Here are a few of the best.

Make QA testing a priority from the very beginning

We know that money is extremely tight when you first set out as a startup. You need to be able to hire great talent, build an amazing product, and then market it to the masses. And all of these things are expensive.

But if you don’t invest in a solid QA plan up front, you’ll regret it in the future when you end up spending a ton more money fixing a software bug. The cost of software defects is always much higher than the amount of money you’ll spend on proper testing, not to mention the damage to your brand and the loss of customer trust.

If you want to build the best product, you need to have the best QA team and plan in place.

Step outside your comfort zone and see your product from other points of view

Sometimes entrepreneurs and business owners are so close to their solutions that it’s hard to see the product from a different point of view. This is why it’s important to have user sessions, focus groups, and your QA team involved throughout the development lifecycle.

Getting feedback and advice on potential problems during development can lessen the chance of problems down the road. Plus, during this process, you may even get a new idea or new feature to add to your solution that you hadn’t even thought of before. Having your own internal team test or analyze your product without outside input is like having the cast of a Broadway play write their own theatre review. It’s completely biased.

It’s difficult to handle criticism with grace, especially when “your business” can seem like “your life.” Trust us when we tell you that welcoming honest and open feedback and acting on that feedback can only serve to make you a better entrepreneur, and make your product a better solution with fewer bugs.

Focus on quality, not quantity

It doesn’t matter how many downloads or users you have if people aren’t actually using your product because it’s not user-friendly or crashes. And it doesn’t matter how quickly you get to market if you are delivering a less-than-stellar solution.

Slow and steady wins the race. Being painstakingly methodical in your development and QA process is the key to producing an application or solution that works exactly the way it was intended.

Focus on the quality of your employees, the quality of your research, the quality of your development, and – most importantly – the quality of your QA team, and you’ll avoid becoming another famous bug example.

In conclusion, they say that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Quality Assurance is not the place to cut back on costs and simply hope for the best. Remember that even the most expensive software programs and applications are vulnerable to bugs.

Also, remember that the cost of software bugs is not just about dollars and cents. Your company’s reputation and everything you worked so hard to build is at risk. And if you need a great extermination team to help prevent bugs in your development process, we can help!